Help! I Inherited the Database From…

Frustrated
Image from Jon Watson

Can you relate to this scenario?

You just inherited a database(s) that is meant for you to track down donations, board members, visitors and everything else. Perhaps there are several files with repeated information or better yet, incomplete information. Sitting in the storage room are files of handwritten notes and check copies, none of which have been entered into a computer. Emails are going back and forth between you and other staff collecting bits and pieces of information making it a tracking nightmare.

So what do you do about when you are tasked with organizing your organizations database in a maze of information?

First, define a plan of attack.

Is the focus to improve on the database moving forward? Or is it necessary to change historical information.  A lot of organizations can just say “forget the past, I’m starting fresh tomorrow.” However, most cannot and they have a lot of cleanup to do.

Historical Data
Photo by Miri

How to Fix Historical Data.

First, don’t panic, move slowly through making manual changes. For fixing historical information, find the immediate priorities. Change only those that are needed right now.

Then when immediate needs are finished, start fixing historical information.

  • Edit anything in ALL CAPS.
  • Merge duplicates; researching duplicates that may be spouses. (DonorSnap provides many different duplicates reports as well as a Merge tool). Develop a standard of how to track spousal records moving forward.
  • Edit historical donations so comparative reports will be beneficial.
  • Inactivate deceased/inactive contacts.
  • Most nonprofits inactivate data entries after 3 years of no activity. Delete from the database after 7 years of no activity.

What is the purpose of the database?

Become familiar with the purpose(s) of the database; get acquainted with current donation programs — what mailings have gone out recently, what campaigns are running, talk to Accounting about their needs with running reports between the donor management system and their books.

Try this: Run a Donations Received report of the past checks, go back and change just those to the current and correct drop-downs, so the report is clear and concise.

Remove Duplicates
Photo by Ian Barbour

Get familiar with current database software.

Look at all the existing drop-downs for targeting contacts (how do you label a Contact as a volunteer or Board Member); how are donations categorized. If using a program like DonorSnap you can inactivate any non-relevant codes for appeals/campaigns/accounting codes (never deleting, you can always bring back if you have a question!). DonorSnap also allows you to HIDE (again, never deleting) entire fields that are no longer relevant.

Tip: Simplify the database to what codes you’re using now (and change historical information later, if needed).

Need to send an appeal mailing to the top donors?

Run a DonationStrata report (or other report that can give you Lifetime donations over a certain amount). Edit those contacts; Merge any duplicates ; make sure the mailing label for the contact is your current standard, and do a mailing.

Make a Cheat-Sheet.

Create a standard and cheat-sheet for all data-entry staff of what Codes to use for Contacts/Donations and a process for entering new contacts and adding donations. Create a mailing standard, how the names should be entered in the system and also how the mailing label should be addressed (in DonorSnap would be the Acknowledgement field).

Tip: Arrange a training with staff to go over the database procedures (they need to know this in case your out of the office)

 

Add a Donate Now Form to your Facebook Page Tabs

Recently we have discovered an even further value for DonorSnap Forms – Facebook Page Tabs. Creating a new Facebook page tab out of a DonorSnap Form is easy enough that any user can implement it. Whether you feel your organization could benefit from a “Donate Now” Facebook tab, a “Join our Mailing List” tab, an “Event Sign Up” tab, or more, follow the step by step guide below. In a matter of minutes, your Facebook page will have an integration with your DonorSnap database.

Donate Now Form as a Facebook Tab

Step One: Create your form

If you aren’t already using DonorSnap for your donor management, you’ll need to sign up for an account first. After you’re signed up, you’ll be ready to create any number of forms that you need. For more help on creating your forms, watch the online forms tutorial video here.

Step Two: Sign up to be a “Facebook Developer”

In order to create your own Facebook Page Tab App, you’ll need to be granted access to the developer area. Don’t worry if this sounds scary. Just keep following the directions and you’ll find it foolproof. You can also brag to your friends that you have developed a Facebook app for your organization.

To sign up, go to https://developers.facebook.com and click the button in the top right corner as shown below. Follow the prompts and verify your account.

Register as a Facebook Developer

Step Three: Create Your Facebook Tab App

After you are verified, you’ll need to go to https://developers.facebook.com/apps to start creating your tab app. Click the “+ Create New App” button at the top of the screen and continue through the prompts confirming that you accept the guidelines and that you are human.

Create a New Facebook Tab App

Next you’ll see the app creation form and your App ID on top. Make sure to note this number, because you’ll need it in the next step. Click the Page Tab check mark and fill out the form with your information. Make sure to fill out the following fields as directed:

  • App Domains: “donorsnap.com”
  • Sandbox Mode: Disabled (if you enable it, your tab will only be visible to administrators)
  • Page Tab Name: This can be whatever you would like your tab to be labeled on your Facebook page.
  • Page Tab URL: Paste your DonorSnap form link for the specific form that you would like to use.
  • Secure Page Tab URL: Use the same thing as the Page Tab URL
  • Page Tab Edit URL: Leave blank

Fill out the form to create your Donate Now Facebook tab

Step Four: Install the Facebook Page Tab App

Now that your Facebook Page Tab app is created, you’ll need to install it on your page. To install it, you’ll need to enter the following address into your browser, but make sure to replace “Your_App_ID” with the number that you wrote down in the step before.

https://www.facebook.com/dialog/pagetab?app_id=YOUR_APP_ID&next=https://www.facebook.com

If you entered the URL correctly, you should be presented with the following page. Select your organization’s Facebook page and click Add Page Tab.

Select your Facebook Page

Step Five: Your new Donate Now form is now a tab on your Facebook Page

That’s it. Now go to your Facebook page and see your new tab available to collect donations or whatever else it was designed for.

Your Donate Now Facebook tab is live

For more information, please refer to the Facebook Page Tab App tutorial. When you finish, let know how you’re using your form on your Facebook page by commenting below.

Not using DonorSnap yet?
Sign up for one of our free webinar demonstrations to see the software in action.
Ready to be set up with your own database? Sign up for your new account now!

 

Stories About Amazing Donors

Do you have a story about an amazing volunteer or donor?

Last month at the Nonprofit Technology Conference in Minneapolis, MN we set out to collect stories that honors the folks that go above and beyond the call of duty.

A Story of a Lifetime Volunteer

Photo by Catherine Scott, 2008

My Grandma Amy is a lifetime volunteer and donor. She has inspired me to volunteer throughout my life and showed me the need to give what you can to charity. I asked her to be a DonorSnap contributor and write about why she cares to help out in her community. I see my Grandma as a good example of the caring donor that many nonprofits would love to have as part of their support network. I asked her to write a bit about why she spends her time and money helping out people. This is what she had to say… Continue reading “A Story of a Lifetime Volunteer”