Making Fundraising and Donor Management Easy

Fundraising can be an exciting process. I’ve seen unimaginable amounts of money come in right before deadlines, which saved staff positions and helped to make incredible years. The celebration in those moments will be memories that I will never forget.

Unfortunately, the fine details of fundraising aren’t always so exciting. Reconnecting with people to remind them of pledged donations could be the equivalent to pulling teeth. Printing, stuffing, and mailing annual contribution statements is something many hope to pass off to interns or volunteers entirely. DonorSnap gets it and is here to help. Here is a glimpse at two important tools that will help you collect more donations and cut processing time down to practically zero.

Recurring Online Donations

  1. Build an online form integrated with your payment processor account, and give your supporters the ability to automate their giving.
  2. Schedule donations based on a time frame or without an end date entirely.
  3. Let the donor choose how to give by using either a credit/debit card or their bank account via ACH.

Recurring Donations Example Form

The tool is so easy to use that if you can use Microsoft Word or Google Docs, you can build a great looking online recurring donations form.

After you’ve created your recurring donation form, place a link to it on your website, in an email, or embed it right on your website. We take care of all the hosting details and send all of the donations scheduled through the form right into your database for review. All it takes is one form submission and your donors can be set up to continue their giving for a lifetime.

Email Contribution Statements

I can’t imagine the time and work it takes for a small nonprofit to process and mail out their end of the year contributions statements. It’s one thing when you have an entire development team taking on the challenge, but for some organizations, we’re talking days or weeks of nonstop administrative work. It is in these moments that you realize how wonderful technology and mail merge are. Now imagine incorporating email into that equation… you’ll probably feel the urge to give a sigh of relief. This is exactly what the email contribution statements can do for your organization.

Email Contribution Statements

DonorSnap has built this feature right into every database. No matter how many contacts you are tracking, you get to use email contribution statements. The same contribution statement generator that you have been using is what makes up the start of this tool.

Next, add in the ability to customize the email that your statements are attached to using merge fields from your database. This means you can personally address each person in your email. You can generate all of your statements and then email them with a single click. The savings in postage alone could be enough to pay for your DonorSnap subscription this year. If it costs $0.50 per letter (not including your time and paper cuts!) compared to the cost of an email (free!)… you can do the math.

If you’re not already using DonorSnap to manage all of your donors, members, and volunteers, feel free to check it out and see how it can save your organization time, money, and effort. Visit the getting started page to view one of our free overview webinars or to get signed up today.

Add a Donate Now Form to your Facebook Page Tabs

Recently we have discovered an even further value for DonorSnap Forms – Facebook Page Tabs. Creating a new Facebook page tab out of a DonorSnap Form is easy enough that any user can implement it. Whether you feel your organization could benefit from a “Donate Now” Facebook tab, a “Join our Mailing List” tab, an “Event Sign Up” tab, or more, follow the step by step guide below. In a matter of minutes, your Facebook page will have an integration with your DonorSnap database.

Donate Now Form as a Facebook Tab

Step One: Create your form

If you aren’t already using DonorSnap for your donor management, you’ll need to sign up for an account first. After you’re signed up, you’ll be ready to create any number of forms that you need. For more help on creating your forms, watch the online forms tutorial video here.

Step Two: Sign up to be a “Facebook Developer”

In order to create your own Facebook Page Tab App, you’ll need to be granted access to the developer area. Don’t worry if this sounds scary. Just keep following the directions and you’ll find it foolproof. You can also brag to your friends that you have developed a Facebook app for your organization.

To sign up, go to https://developers.facebook.com and click the button in the top right corner as shown below. Follow the prompts and verify your account.

Register as a Facebook Developer

Step Three: Create Your Facebook Tab App

After you are verified, you’ll need to go to https://developers.facebook.com/apps to start creating your tab app. Click the “+ Create New App” button at the top of the screen and continue through the prompts confirming that you accept the guidelines and that you are human.

Create a New Facebook Tab App

Next you’ll see the app creation form and your App ID on top. Make sure to note this number, because you’ll need it in the next step. Click the Page Tab check mark and fill out the form with your information. Make sure to fill out the following fields as directed:

  • App Domains: “donorsnap.com”
  • Sandbox Mode: Disabled (if you enable it, your tab will only be visible to administrators)
  • Page Tab Name: This can be whatever you would like your tab to be labeled on your Facebook page.
  • Page Tab URL: Paste your DonorSnap form link for the specific form that you would like to use.
  • Secure Page Tab URL: Use the same thing as the Page Tab URL
  • Page Tab Edit URL: Leave blank

Fill out the form to create your Donate Now Facebook tab

Step Four: Install the Facebook Page Tab App

Now that your Facebook Page Tab app is created, you’ll need to install it on your page. To install it, you’ll need to enter the following address into your browser, but make sure to replace “Your_App_ID” with the number that you wrote down in the step before.

https://www.facebook.com/dialog/pagetab?app_id=YOUR_APP_ID&next=https://www.facebook.com

If you entered the URL correctly, you should be presented with the following page. Select your organization’s Facebook page and click Add Page Tab.

Select your Facebook Page

Step Five: Your new Donate Now form is now a tab on your Facebook Page

That’s it. Now go to your Facebook page and see your new tab available to collect donations or whatever else it was designed for.

Your Donate Now Facebook tab is live

For more information, please refer to the Facebook Page Tab App tutorial. When you finish, let know how you’re using your form on your Facebook page by commenting below.

Not using DonorSnap yet?
Sign up for one of our free webinar demonstrations to see the software in action.
Ready to be set up with your own database? Sign up for your new account now!

 

Putting Your Linkedin to Use, Finding Board Members and Donors.

I am overwhelmed by the amount of information that Linkedin provides. Until recently I thought of it just as a job seeking site. What I learned last week at the Nonprofit Technology Conference in Minneapolis, MN is it is a much more powerful tool than I had imagined. I took a few notes by Anthony Pisapia Director of Development and Programs at Tech Impact.

Let’s start with your network.

Linkedin Maps
Linkedin has a system for visualizing your own network.

The six degrees of separation rule still stands. If you are looking for potential donors or influential board members, it is likely that those who you already know have a contact that would be a good fit.

Your 1st degree connections should be people you actually know and feel comfortable enough  to ask them for a favor.

If in your network a current board member is connected to a potential donor, you should feel ok asking for that introduction.

 

Tip: Ask for introductions outside of Linkedin, such as in an email or a phone call.

I am not strict on this rule for a couple of reasons. First, you can download the entire contact address book of your Linkedin connections. This is good for developing an email list and for CRM information. Second, potential volunteers and donors may be following you personally. Knowing you through Linkedin may give them the encouragement to connect.

Get your members to promote your organization.

Linkedin Volunteer Section
Provide information for your board members to add into their profile.

Browse through the profiles of your board members and volunteers. Where does it say they are part of your organization? They can add information about their participation in the volunteer section.
For patrons and fans of your organization. They can promote you in the Organizations section of Linkedin.

Organizations on Linkedin

Tip: Provide the text you want them to put into their Linkedin Profiles. Make sure your organization and staff profile is updated.

Tap into your alumni network.

Linkedin Alumni NetworkYour alumni network is strong. When you click on a school it shows you options such as years attended, industry, location, etc. Use this to your advantage when identifying potential board members and donors.

Add reminder notes to profiles.

Reminder Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a conference or meeting someone, check out their profile and add information about your conversation with them. They will not be able to see what you have written. This is for your personal information only.

Tip: Use the Linkedin App for notes and reminders before you head out to a meeting.

Did you know that you can add DonorSnap as a skill on Linkedin?

DonorSnap Skill
Go to Edit Profile, Skills, Add DonorSnap.

 

A Story of a Lifetime Volunteer

Photo by Catherine Scott, 2008

My Grandma Amy is a lifetime volunteer and donor. She has inspired me to volunteer throughout my life and showed me the need to give what you can to charity. I asked her to be a DonorSnap contributor and write about why she cares to help out in her community. I see my Grandma as a good example of the caring donor that many nonprofits would love to have as part of their support network. I asked her to write a bit about why she spends her time and money helping out people. This is what she had to say… Continue reading “A Story of a Lifetime Volunteer”